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HowToCookFiletMignon.com

   

 

 


By: Brenda Kohlmyer


 


 

How to Broil Filet Mignon

You don’t really need a recipe for broiling filet mignon at home, what you do need are an oven with a functioning broiler element and a good broiler pan . A broiler pan consists of a top flat pan pierced with slots and nested in a shallow lower pan. You lay the meat on the top pan and its open slots allow fat and juices to drip into the lower pan.

Because the broiler elements are located in the top of the oven, you’ll need to adjust the top rack so it is either on the top position or the second position down from the broiler elements. The closer the rack is to the elements, the faster the outside of the meat will warm up, and the faster it can burn if not watched closely.

Since filet mignon is often cut 1 ½” thick, and because the pan is about 1” deep, it may be best to adjust the oven’s rack to the second row from the top.

When you are ready to cook dinnner, arrange the filet mignon steaks on the broiler pan and let them set at room temperature for about 15 to 20 minutes. Then turn the broiler on and let it warm up, about an addition 5 minutes.

   

 

   

Once the filet mignon steaks are under the broiler, set the kitchen timer for two minutes and turn the steaks when the timer goes off. Set the timer for another two minutes and turn the steaks when the timer goes off again. Set the timer at four minutes for each of the next two rotations and check the meat for temperature at the end of the second long rotation.

This 12 minute rotation should yield rare steaks, but you can add time if you prefer your filet mignon medium rare or medium. Experts recommend that filet mignon will be most flavorful if it’s not over cooked, so medium (about 145* internal temp. just off the heat) would be the most you’d want to cook these delicate steaks.

Once you take the steaks out of the oven, let them rest on the broiler pan for about 5 minutes. They will continue to cook while you prepare to plate your meal.

 


You can find more information on buying whole beef tenderloin or USDA Prime filet mignon steaks by contacting the Cattlemen's Beef Board and National Cattlemen's Beef Association